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Catholic News

IMAGE: CNS photo/David AgrenBy David AgrenHUIXTLA, Mexico (CNS) -- Members of St. Francis of Assisi Parish in this southern Mexican city rose early Oct. 24 to feed but a fraction of the Central American migrants traveling in a caravan, which is trying to traverse Mexico and reach the United States border."Tortas! Take one. The road ahead is long," Rafael Gomez yelled from the bed of a white pickup to the passing migrants as they streamed out of town in the predawn hours. They had slept in the streets in what resembled an impromptu refugee camp."God bless you," the grateful recipients responded as they took the ham sandwiches and head for Mapastepec 40 miles ahead.The caravan left Honduras Oct. 13 and has swelled to at least 4,500 participants, according to the Mexican government.Nearly 1,700 people already have requested asylum in the country, but most of the migrants interviewed told Catholic News Service they want to arrive in the U.S., where an uncertain welco...

IMAGE: CNS photo/David Agren

By David Agren

HUIXTLA, Mexico (CNS) -- Members of St. Francis of Assisi Parish in this southern Mexican city rose early Oct. 24 to feed but a fraction of the Central American migrants traveling in a caravan, which is trying to traverse Mexico and reach the United States border.

"Tortas! Take one. The road ahead is long," Rafael Gomez yelled from the bed of a white pickup to the passing migrants as they streamed out of town in the predawn hours. They had slept in the streets in what resembled an impromptu refugee camp.

"God bless you," the grateful recipients responded as they took the ham sandwiches and head for Mapastepec 40 miles ahead.

The caravan left Honduras Oct. 13 and has swelled to at least 4,500 participants, according to the Mexican government.

Nearly 1,700 people already have requested asylum in the country, but most of the migrants interviewed told Catholic News Service they want to arrive in the U.S., where an uncertain welcome awaits.

Catholics working with migrants describe the caravan as the response to a desperate situation in Central America's northern triangle -- Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador -- as poverty, violence and drought push people to risk the treacherous road through Mexico. Political unrest and the persecution of anti-government protesters in Nicaragua have sent even more people fleeing with some joining in the caravan.

The problem, however, is especially acute in Honduras as prices rise, salaries stagnate and gangs prey on populations. Many Hondurans report being charged "war taxes," or extortion, to live in their own homes.

"This is an indignant reality caused by the current situation in our country," the Honduras bishops' conference said in an Oct. 20 statement on the caravan.

"It's forcing a determined group to leave behind what little they have, risking themselves without any certainty on the migrant route toward the United States, with the desire of reaching the promised 'American dream,' which would allow them to resolve their economic problems, improve their living conditions and, in many cases, preserve their physical safety," the bishops said.

They bitterly noted, however, the country has come to depend on remittances as Hondurans in the U.S. supported family members back home.

"We have preferred to be happy with remittances as a solution to our internal problems. What's new about this caravan is the massive way thousands of people, the majority young, are going with the hope obtaining sufficient resources to transform Honduras," the bishops said.

The origins of the caravan remain murky, but the migrants marching through Mexico said they either saw news reports, social media postings or heard rumors about it. Many thought it was a way to find safety in numbers as they headed north. Criminal gangs and crooked cops in Mexico often prey on small groups of migrants.

The caravan has captured widespread international attention. It also has caused controversy in the U.S. as President Donald Trump has tweeted his displeasure. Trump has threatened to cut foreign aid to Central American countries in retaliation and adamantly stated the migrants will not enter the U.S.

Governments in Guatemala and Mexico have tried to impede the caravan.

Mexico closed its end of the bridge at its border with Guatemala, prompting migrants to swim and raft across the Suchiate River, which separates the two nations.

Mexico also sent two planeloads of Federal Police officers to its southern border, but the caravan pushed past them.

"Their hands are tied," Huixtla Mayor Jose Luis Laparra Calderon said of the Federal Police. He pointed to the presence of foreign journalists and human rights groups for preventing the Federal Police from taking a heavy-handed response.

Caravan participants act unfazed in the face of Trump's threats and expressed hope that he has a change of heart or a higher power intervenes. Almost all shared fears of being returned.

"We don't want to return to Honduras after all of this effort to get here. We only want to live a better life," said Elias Ruiz, 21, a construction worker who fled San Pedro Sula after being unable to support his wife and infant son.

Ruiz hit the road after having to pay tattooed gangsters the war tax. Work also was spotty and he couldn't make ends meet.

"If you don't pay them, they'll kill you," he said of the gangs. "They say, 'We'll make an example of you.' The example is they kill you."

Upon decamping Huixtla, the caravan slowly snaked along the coastal plain of Chiapas state under scorching temperatures. People walked until they were tired, then hitchhiked, hopping aboard pickups, dump trucks and tractor trailers. People even pushed strollers with infants and carried toddlers on their shoulders.

Chiapas is Mexico's poorest state, but people along the route shared bottles of water, bunches of bananas and surplus clothing and cushions with the passing throngs.

Parishes in the Diocese of Tapachula have collect supplies for the caravan and fed its hungry participants, with the parish in Huixtla distributing 3,000 tamales and other provisions. Karime Alejandro Garcia, 19, and Dana de los Santos, 17, brought bags of clothes collected at St. Bartholomew Parish to the highway as the caravan passed the town of Villa Comaltitlan.

"Every barrio was collaborating as it could, some collected clothes, others water, food," Alejandro said. "Little by little we're working to have something we could give our brothers."

"As a diocese, we're trying to accompany, as the Holy Father says, care for and protect migrants," Father Cesar Canaveral, diocesan migrant ministry director, said. "Unfortunately, we don't have a government that is responding to the needs of this caravan."

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, CatBy WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Francis has removed Bishop Martin D. Holley of Memphis, Tennessee, from the pastoral governance of the diocese and has named as apostolic administrator Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky.Bishop Holley, 63, a former auxiliary bishop of Washington, was installed Oct. 19, 2016, as the fifth bishop of Memphis. He succeeded Bishop J. Terry Steib when he retired."I humbly accept the appointment of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, to serve as the apostolic administrator of the Diocese of Memphis, while remaining archbishop of Louisville," Archbishop Kurtz said in an Oct. 24 statement confirming his appointment."I am eager to work with the priests, curia and faithful of the Diocese of Memphis to promote stability, peace and healing until Pope Francis appoints a new bishop. I have admired the church in Memphis for many years, particularly from my time as bishop of Knoxville," he said."I ...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Cat

By

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Francis has removed Bishop Martin D. Holley of Memphis, Tennessee, from the pastoral governance of the diocese and has named as apostolic administrator Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky.

Bishop Holley, 63, a former auxiliary bishop of Washington, was installed Oct. 19, 2016, as the fifth bishop of Memphis. He succeeded Bishop J. Terry Steib when he retired.

"I humbly accept the appointment of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, to serve as the apostolic administrator of the Diocese of Memphis, while remaining archbishop of Louisville," Archbishop Kurtz said in an Oct. 24 statement confirming his appointment.

"I am eager to work with the priests, curia and faithful of the Diocese of Memphis to promote stability, peace and healing until Pope Francis appoints a new bishop. I have admired the church in Memphis for many years, particularly from my time as bishop of Knoxville," he said.

"I ask for prayers for Bishop Martin Holley as he departs from this local church and for the entire church of Memphis. Let us pray for one another during this time of transition," he added.

Archbishop Kurtz told Catholic News Service in an email message that he had just arrived in Memphis the morning of Oct. 24.

No statement has yet been released by the Memphis Diocese as to what led to Pope Francis' decision to remove Bishop Holley from the pastoral governance of the diocese.

Some months after he was installed as bishop there, Bishop Holley came under heavy criticism from clergy and parishioners for his decision to reassign two-thirds of the diocese's 60 active priests, except for five who were slated for retirement.

"No set policy existed at the time Bishop Holley arrived, on how long a parish assignment would last," then-diocesan spokesman Vince Higgins told CNS in June.

"The amount of time a priest spends (in an assignment) depends on the location and influence of the parish," Higgins added. "Associate pastors are moved more frequently, and Bishop Holley has decided to appoint pastors for six-year terms, with a possible renewal of the term for six more years."

Asked about priests' and parishioners' criticism that the changes were not communicated well across the diocese, Higgins stated that "Bishop Holley is always attentive to the needs of the 40 parishes which make up the Diocese of Memphis."

The bishop also was criticized for bringing in a religious order priest, Msgr. Clement J. Machado, to be his vicar general, rather than choosing a vicar general from among the priests of the diocese. Msgr. Machado, who is Canadian and was ministering in Corpus Christi, Texas, is a member of the Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity.

Local clergy raised questions about whether proper church procedures had been followed for Msgr. Machado's transfer to the diocese. The priest took the post in June 2017 and resigned about a year later.

The complaints about Bishop Holley prompted the Vatican -- through the nunciature in the U.S. -- to assign two U.S. archbishops to make an apostolic visitation this summer to the diocese, Archbishops Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta and Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis.

Citing two unnamed sources in the diocese, The Commercial Appeal daily newspaper reported that Archbishops Gregory and Hebda visited the diocese June 18-20 for a fact-finding trip. They reportedly talked to between 40 and 50 clergy and a number of laypeople.

No one from the Memphis Diocese or the prelates' respective archdioceses would comment on the visitation when CNS asked for confirmation it had taken place.

However, Bishop Holley did confirm the visit had taken place in a June 22 letter to priests; CNS received a copy of the letter Oct. 24.

"Many of you may have read, seen or heard news this week that an apostolic visitation was made to our diocese," he wrote. "We are respectful of the confidentiality of the apostolic nunciature's process and are thankful that some of you were invited to participate in that process.

"The purpose of an apostolic visitation is to assist the local diocese and improve the local church's ability to minister to the people it serves," he added. "My hope is that we continue that mission here together in our diocese. The goal continues to be for the common good of our local church and the people entrusted to our care."

Before his appointment as bishop of Memphis, Bishop Holley was an auxiliary bishop of the Washington Archdiocese for 12 years. There he served as vicar general and was a member of the archdiocesan college of consultors, priest's council, seminarian review board, administrative board. He was chairman of the college of deans, which oversees the 14 deaneries in the archdiocese.

Bishop Holley was born in Pensacola, Florida. He attended Theological College in Washington and completed his seminary studies at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach, Florida. He was ordained as a priest of the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee in 1987.

In Florida, then-Father Holley served as a parochial vicar and later administrator of St. Mary Parish in Fort Walton Beach. He also served at St. Paul and Little Flower parishes in Pensacola. He served as spiritual director of the Serra Club of West Florida, which promotes vocations to the priesthood, and for many years was a member of the Joint Conference of the National Black Catholic Clergy Caucus.

His ordination as a bishop to serve the Washington Archdiocese took place in 2004 at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle. He chose "His Mercy Endures" as his episcopal motto, after having developed a great devotion to St. Faustina and her message of Divine Mercy during his years as a priest.

He has served on a number of committees for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, including the committees on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth; Pro-Life Activities; and National Collections. He has also served on committees for communications and cultural diversity and subcommittees on Africa, African-American Catholics, Hispanic affairs and migration.

There are 42 parishes and three missions in the Memphis Diocese, which covers 10,682 square miles. Catholics number over 65,000, or 4.5 percent of the area's total population.

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Contributing to this story was Robert Glover in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul HaringBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Every heart longs for unconditional love and fidelity, Pope Francis said."Christ reveals authentic love," the pope said Oct. 24 during his weekly general audience. "He is the faithful friend who welcomes us even when we make mistakes and he always wants what is best for us, even when we don't deserve it," he said."Indeed, no human relationship is authentic without fidelity and loyalty," he told thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter's Square.Continuing his series of talks on the Ten Commandments, the pope reflected on Christ's explanation of the Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not commit adultery.""What God has joined together, no human being must separate" and whoever divorces their spouse to marry another, commits adultery, Jesus said according to St. Mark's Gospel.There are many forms of adultery, the pope said in his audience talk, and fidelity actually reflects "a ...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul Haring

By Carol Glatz

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Every heart longs for unconditional love and fidelity, Pope Francis said.

"Christ reveals authentic love," the pope said Oct. 24 during his weekly general audience. "He is the faithful friend who welcomes us even when we make mistakes and he always wants what is best for us, even when we don't deserve it," he said.

"Indeed, no human relationship is authentic without fidelity and loyalty," he told thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter's Square.

Continuing his series of talks on the Ten Commandments, the pope reflected on Christ's explanation of the Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not commit adultery."

"What God has joined together, no human being must separate" and whoever divorces their spouse to marry another, commits adultery, Jesus said according to St. Mark's Gospel.

There are many forms of adultery, the pope said in his audience talk, and fidelity actually reflects "a way of being" and living in the world.

"You work with devotion, you speak with sincerity, you stay faithful to the truth in your thoughts and deeds," he said.

Men and women whose lives are "woven with fidelity" are "faithful and trustworthy in every circumstance," he said.

But "our human nature is not enough" for bringing about this beautiful way of life, he said. "It is necessary for God's fidelity to come into our lives and 'infect' us."

"The Sixth Commandment calls us to turn our gaze to Christ, who with his fidelity can take away our adulterous heart and give us a faithful heart," the pope said.

The pope reiterated his call for stronger and more effective catechesis in preparation for marriage. This new catechumenate is necessary, he said, because "you can't play around with love," especially when it comes to making a vow that lasts a lifetime.

A marriage preparation program that involve just a few meetings is not preparation, "it is fake," he said. It is the full responsibility of the parish priest and bishop to make sure the proper amount of time and discernment have been spent preparing for something that is a true sacrament, not a just formality.

The pope said that "every human being needs to be loved unconditionally" and those who do not experience this will seek to fill the void with "surrogates," accepting "compromises and mediocrity" that hardly qualify as love, and mistaking "puppy love" and immature relationships as the true "light" of one's life.

Men and women seeking marriage must go beyond physical attraction and discover through a mature and lengthy discernment "the quality of their relationship."

They must discern with certainty whether "the hand of God" is leading and accompanying them on their journey, he added.

A couple cannot promise to be faithful "for better, for worse" and to love and honor each other every day of their lives "only on the basis of good intentions or on the hope that things 'work out.' They need to base it on the solid terrain of God's faithful love."

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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IMAGE: CNSBy Rhina GuidosWASHINGTON (CNS) -- Days after the Catholic Church declared Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero a saint, a judge in El Salvador issued a capture order for a former military captain suspected of killing the religious leader in 1980 as he celebrated Mass.Judge Rigoberto Chicas issued the order Oct. 23 for national and international authorities to apprehend Alvaro Rafael Saravia, who has for years been a suspect in the killing. He remains at large and is believed to be in hiding. It's not the first time such an order has been issued against Saravia.He was arrested in 1987 in Miami and has faced a variety of legal proceedings in El Salvador for years that proved fruitless in any meaningful prosecution because of an amnesty law that prevented prosecution of human rights violations by the military tied to the country's 1980-1992 civil war.However, the 1993 law was thrown out by the country's highest court in 2016 and the case involving the killing of the a...

IMAGE: CNS

By Rhina Guidos

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Days after the Catholic Church declared Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero a saint, a judge in El Salvador issued a capture order for a former military captain suspected of killing the religious leader in 1980 as he celebrated Mass.

Judge Rigoberto Chicas issued the order Oct. 23 for national and international authorities to apprehend Alvaro Rafael Saravia, who has for years been a suspect in the killing. He remains at large and is believed to be in hiding. It's not the first time such an order has been issued against Saravia.

He was arrested in 1987 in Miami and has faced a variety of legal proceedings in El Salvador for years that proved fruitless in any meaningful prosecution because of an amnesty law that prevented prosecution of human rights violations by the military tied to the country's 1980-1992 civil war.

However, the 1993 law was thrown out by the country's highest court in 2016 and the case involving the killing of the archbishop was reopened the following year.

On the day before his assassination in San Salvador on March 24, 1980, St. Romero had demanded that the soldiers stop killing innocent civilians and had advocated for an end to the violence engulfing the Central American country. The conflict went on to last another 12 years, claiming more than 70,000 civilian lives, including the archbishop's.

In issuing the arrest order, Chicas said authorities have sufficient evidence to charge Saravia for participation in the crime. A United Nation's Truth Commission accused another Salvadoran military strongman, Major Roberto D'Aubuisson, a right-wing leader suspected of organizing the country's notorious death squads, of being the architect of the archbishop's assassination. D'Aubuisson died of cancer in 1992 and was never charged.

The arrest order comes nine days after the archbishop was declared a saint in a ceremony at the Vatican on Oct. 14. Maria Luisa de Martinez, D'Aubuisson's sister and a founder of the Archbishop Romero Foundation, attended the canonization.

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, CatBy WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Francis has removed Bishop Martin D. Holley of Memphis, Tennessee, from the pastoral governance of the diocese and has named as apostolic administrator Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky.Bishop Holley, 63, a former auxiliary bishop of Washington, was installed Oct. 19, 2016, as the fifth bishop of Memphis. He succeeded Bishop J. Terry Steib when he retired."I humbly accept the appointment of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, to serve as the apostolic administrator of the Diocese of Memphis, while remaining archbishop of Louisville," Archbishop Kurtz said in an Oct. 24 statement confirming his appointment."I am eager to work with the priests, curia and faithful of the Diocese of Memphis to promote stability, peace and healing until Pope Francis appoints a new bishop. I have admired the church in Memphis for many years, particularly from my time as bishop of Knoxville," he said."I ...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Cat

By

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Francis has removed Bishop Martin D. Holley of Memphis, Tennessee, from the pastoral governance of the diocese and has named as apostolic administrator Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky.

Bishop Holley, 63, a former auxiliary bishop of Washington, was installed Oct. 19, 2016, as the fifth bishop of Memphis. He succeeded Bishop J. Terry Steib when he retired.

"I humbly accept the appointment of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, to serve as the apostolic administrator of the Diocese of Memphis, while remaining archbishop of Louisville," Archbishop Kurtz said in an Oct. 24 statement confirming his appointment.

"I am eager to work with the priests, curia and faithful of the Diocese of Memphis to promote stability, peace and healing until Pope Francis appoints a new bishop. I have admired the church in Memphis for many years, particularly from my time as bishop of Knoxville," he said.

"I ask for prayers for Bishop Martin Holley as he departs from this local church and for the entire church of Memphis. Let us pray for one another during this time of transition," he added.

Archbishop Kurtz told Catholic News Service in an email message that he had just arrived in Memphis the morning of Oct. 24.

No statement has yet been released by the Memphis Diocese as to what led to Pope Francis' decision to remove Bishop Holley from the pastoral governance of the diocese.

Some months after he was installed as bishop there, Bishop Holley came under heavy criticism from clergy and parishioners for his decision to reassign two-thirds of the diocese's 60 active priests, except for five who were slated for retirement.

"No set policy existed at the time Bishop Holley arrived, on how long a parish assignment would last," then-diocesan spokesman Vince Higgins told CNS in June.

"The amount of time a priest spends (in an assignment) depends on the location and influence of the parish," Higgins added. "Associate pastors are moved more frequently, and Bishop Holley has decided to appoint pastors for six-year terms, with a possible renewal of the term for six more years."

Asked about priests' and parishioners' criticism that the changes were not communicated well across the diocese, Higgins stated that "Bishop Holley is always attentive to the needs of the 40 parishes which make up the Diocese of Memphis."

The bishop also was criticized for bringing in a Canadian priest to be his vicar general, Msgr. Clement J. Machado, rather than choosing a vicar general from among the priests of the diocese. Local clergy raised questions about whether proper church procedures had been followed for Msgr. Machado's transfer to the diocese. The priest resigned from the post some weeks later and returned to Canada.

The complaints about Bishop Holley prompted the Vatican -- through the nunciature in the U.S. -- to assign two U.S. archbishops to make an apostolic visitation this summer to the diocese, Archbishops Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta and Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis.

Citing two unnamed sources in the diocese, The Commercial Appeal daily newspaper reported that Archbishops Gregory and Hebda visited the diocese June 18-20 for a fact-finding trip. They reportedly talked to between 40 and 50 clergy and a number of laypeople.

No one from the Memphis Diocese or the prelates' respective archdioceses would comment on the visitation when CNS asked for confirmation it had taken place.

Before his appointment as bishop of Memphis, Bishop Holley was an auxiliary bishop of the Washington Archdiocese for 12 years. There he served as vicar general and was a member of the archdiocesan college of consultors, priest's council, seminarian review board, administrative board. He was chairman of the college of deans, which oversees the 14 deaneries in the archdiocese.

Bishop Holley was born in Pensacola, Florida. He attended Theological College in Washington and completed his seminary studies at St. Vincent de Paul Seminary in Boynton Beach, Florida. He was ordained as a priest of the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee in 1987.

In Florida, then-Father Holley served as a parochial vicar and later administrator of St. Mary Parish in Fort Walton Beach. He also served at St. Paul and Little Flower parishes in Pensacola. He served as spiritual director of the Serra Club of West Florida, which promotes vocations to the priesthood, and for many years was a member of the Joint Conference of the National Black Catholic Clergy Caucus.

His ordination as a bishop to serve the Washington Archdiocese took place in 2004 at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle. He chose "His Mercy Endures" as his episcopal motto, after having developed a great devotion to St. Faustina and her message of Divine Mercy during his years as a priest.

He has served on a number of committees for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, including the committees on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth; Pro-Life Activities; and National Collections. He has also served on committees for communications and cultural diversity and subcommittees on Africa, African-American Catholics, Hispanic affairs and migration.

There are 42 parishes and three missions in the Memphis Diocese, which covers 10,682 square miles. Catholics number over 65,000, or 4.5 percent of the area's total population.

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Contributing to this story was Robert Glover in Lexington, Kentucky.

- - -

Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul HaringBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- With the launch of a new book, Pope Francis is calling for a new alliance -- between young and old -- to change the world.In an effort to counteract today's "culture of waste" that too easily marginalizes or ignores the young and the elderly, the book by Loyola Press creates a model of storytelling, dialogue, connection and reflection to help inspire these two groups to come together and rediscover older people's lost "treasure of their wisdom."Packed with large full-color photographs of the elder contributors, the coffee-table-style book, titled, "Sharing the Wisdom of Time," was released Oct. 23 at a book launch in Rome, with the pope scheduled to attend.The 175-page book fleshes out what Pope Francis said he feels "the Lord wants me to say: that there should be an alliance between the young and old people."This alliance entails elders sharing their past experiences, advice, in...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul Haring

By Carol Glatz

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- With the launch of a new book, Pope Francis is calling for a new alliance -- between young and old -- to change the world.

In an effort to counteract today's "culture of waste" that too easily marginalizes or ignores the young and the elderly, the book by Loyola Press creates a model of storytelling, dialogue, connection and reflection to help inspire these two groups to come together and rediscover older people's lost "treasure of their wisdom."

Packed with large full-color photographs of the elder contributors, the coffee-table-style book, titled, "Sharing the Wisdom of Time," was released Oct. 23 at a book launch in Rome, with the pope scheduled to attend.

The 175-page book fleshes out what Pope Francis said he feels "the Lord wants me to say: that there should be an alliance between the young and old people."

This alliance entails elders sharing their past experiences, advice, insights and dreams with younger people who are hungry for guidance and support as they prepare for their future, the pope said in the book's preface.

Older people need to be "memory keepers," forming a choir of praise and prayers supporting the people around them, he wrote, especially younger people, showing them the secrets to not just survival, but finding meaning and living life to the full, he said.

The pope calls on young people "to listen to and bond with their elders," and the book offers a starter course, of sorts, offering scores of stories and wisdom from older people from 30 countries and from every walk of life: retired lawyers and engineers, farmers, garbage pickers, activists, refugees and a spiritual elder of the Lakota People in the United States. They speak of their experiences with racism, forgiveness, imperfection, conversion, beauty and joy despite the setbacks.

The stories are spread over five thematic chapters: work, struggle, love, death and hope, and each chapter begins with the pope reflecting on each theme. People's stories are interspersed with the pope's own reflections on an individual's story, showing a model of how to mine its message for nuggets of advice that may mirror or be applied to one's own life.

The book also includes a few stories by younger people sharing, "What I learned from an elder" and how an older person acted like an anchor, offering hope, support or inspiration in their lives.

The book invites readers to find opportunities to dialogue with elders and to visit www.sharingwisdomoftime.com for ideas and suggestions on how to spearhead intergenerational conversations, events and projects at home, in their communities and their parishes.

Some of the words of wisdom by the pope in the book:

-- "Failure is the source of much wisdom," he said. "No complaining allowed! It does not help. It does more harm than good."

-- "Our life is not given to us as an already scripted opera libretto," where all the scenes are predetermined and fixed. "Failures cannot stop us if we feel the fire in our heart" to move forward and learn from mistakes.

-- "The success of life is not glory but patience. Sometimes you need a lot of it."

-- "Our God wants to join us in our history," he said. Just being content with survival and "not wanting to make history is a parasitic attitude."

-- Speaking about refugees who have faced insecurity with discernment and courage to leave their homes, they "will not let themselves be overcome by difficulties." They refuse to accept defeat, "there is no wisdom in just giving up."

-- One person cannot solve all the problems in the world, but she or he can oppose it with being good, kind and caring to oneself and others. "You can fight with the smile and with the readiness to be kind to others."

-- "Learn the wisdom of getting help. You experience the solidarity that allows your heart to dream" and pull one out of despair.

-- "Failure is not the last word. Failure always has a door that opens; woe to you if you turn it into a wall. You will never be able to get free."

-- "Sometimes we turn our little misadventures into epic dramas," but people need to put things into their proper perspective and maybe have a good sense of humor. "Love is creative and it will not be overcome by the disasters and pitfalls of life."

-- "We can look at death and feel rich, because God lavishly 'wastes' his grace poured out on us."

-- "If God did not forgive sins, the world would have ceased existing a long time ago."

-- It is easy to judge others who have sinned, but "what I see are people who have lived," he said. "Hope can be read in wrinkles."

-- On life being like a tapestry, "there is good and bad, death and life. If I look at my life, I like to think that the Lord would say with a smile, 'Look what I did with all your mistakes,'" giving the tangled threads new shape and meaning.

-- "Hypocrites will be scandalized by the miracles God works with our mistakes." Reversing a situation from sin to grace "is one of the most wonderful ways God acts in our lives."

-- "Complaining rusts out the soul," so do not pine over lost opportunities and temporal glory, remember the true final destination is to be with God.

-- "Faith is not paying a toll to go to heaven." God wants people to go forward with his love and "give us back to ourselves. God does not want anything 'from' us; he wants everything 'for' us."

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The book can be purchased online in English at: www.loyolapress.com/products/books/pope-francis/sharing-the-wisdom-of-time?utm_source=swotweb&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=ffa18&utm_content=order

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Terray Sylvester, ReutersBy Tom TracyMIAMI (CNS) -- Yirca Salazar, a quality assurance specialist for Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami, was just a toddler when 1992's Category-5 Hurricane Andrew left a trail of destruction south of Miami.But Salazar doesn't remember much about that historic storm, whose wind strength is being compared to this year's Hurricane Michael and its cataclysmic impact on parts of the Florida Panhandle.But Salazar said she will remember the destruction Michael has wrought."This was my first time to volunteer in providing disaster relief firsthand and for me was a great experience to be that face, and to be those hands that work with the community and actually being able to say to people, 'We have food and we have diapers and we have water,'" Salazar told the Florida Catholic, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami.She was part of a four-person team from Catholic Charities of Miami to do a four-day, fact-finding and nee...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Terray Sylvester, Reuters

By Tom Tracy

MIAMI (CNS) -- Yirca Salazar, a quality assurance specialist for Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami, was just a toddler when 1992's Category-5 Hurricane Andrew left a trail of destruction south of Miami.

But Salazar doesn't remember much about that historic storm, whose wind strength is being compared to this year's Hurricane Michael and its cataclysmic impact on parts of the Florida Panhandle.

But Salazar said she will remember the destruction Michael has wrought.

"This was my first time to volunteer in providing disaster relief firsthand and for me was a great experience to be that face, and to be those hands that work with the community and actually being able to say to people, 'We have food and we have diapers and we have water,'" Salazar told the Florida Catholic, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami.

She was part of a four-person team from Catholic Charities of Miami to do a four-day, fact-finding and needs assessment during the week of Oct. 15 in three or four rural and coastal areas of the Florida Panhandle.

Hurricane Michael's Oct. 10 landfall brought near Category-5 strength winds when it came ashore at Mexico Beach, near Panama City on the Florida Gulf Coast. Two weeks after the storm came ashore, Michael's death toll has risen to 29 in Florida alone and a total of 39 across the Southern United States. Much of the impacted region remains without power and clean water.

While housed at a Catholic retreat center in nearby Tallahassee, the Miami team focused on needs assessments and establishing a new distribution center in the town of Quincy, where some 99 percent of the residents of the rural area are Hispanic farmworkers, including seasonal workers and those in the country without legal documents.

They also toured the towns of Port St. Joe and hard-hit Mexico Beach near Panama City, considered the storm's epicenter.

"We drove by to see what the impact was in Mexico Beach and it is really sad to see so many homes destroyed -- it will take a long time for them to recover," Salazar said. "In Quincy, there are a lot of migrant workers and a lot of their crops are damaged so they are not working. We saw very large families of six, eight and 11 people."

She noted the Miami team may return at a future date and that other Catholic Charities teams are helping to staff the volunteer distribution sites, generally staged at about four Catholic churches.

Some of the distributions sites are so busy that drive-by food and supplies distribution are the best way to manage the demands.

A ground-zero distribution site at St. Dominic Church in Panama City has been accommodating some 4,000 to 5,000 persons a day coming for food and cleaning supplies, including about 3,000 people a day who request a hot meal, according to Matthew Knee, executive director of Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida.

Knee said it requires some 75 volunteers a day to run the St. Dominic site during the week and about double that on the weekends. He estimated that an estimated 10 church properties experienced severe damage, with three or four churches rendered unusable.

"We have redefined what severe damage is now. If the church still has four walls and part of a roof, they are doing pretty well. A few have been taken down to their foundations, including Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Mexico Beach, which was really taken down to the foundation," said Knee.

He said he grew up in Florida and that until now, 2004's Hurricane Ivan was the regional benchmark for destructive storms in the Panhandle. But Michael's wind and storm surge may have reset the bar, he noted.

"People here are saying Hurricane Ivan did not compare to Michael: This one the damage is so widespread and totally different. Many are saying Hurricane Michael hands down makes Ivan look like an afternoon thunderstorm and will be the new baseline," said Knee, who underscored the need for a continuing volunteer effort to run basic goods distribution sites for the foreseeable future.

"We are still doing our immediate needs assistance out of multiple churches," he said. "The community has really pulled together, but our concern is that this will get pushed out of the way by the next big storm or next big news story. Please do not forget us. This will be a long process."

Devika Austin, a Catholic Charities staffer from Miami, said she spoke with clergy at St. Thomas the Apostle, a rural inland parish in Quincy, some 80 miles north of Mexico Beach, where power outages and wind damages are spelling trouble for the tomato-growing business and its workforce there.

"This is their time to start working their crops and with the storm they don't know if people will stay and try to work the situation or if they end up leaving," Austin said. "There is no water in areas and no natural gas. We saw some were cooking outdoors."

Austin helped establish a new distribution of donations in Quincy, and another team from other Florida dioceses were expected to continue staffing the site this week.

Peter Routsis-Arroyo, CEO of Catholic Charities of Miami, noted that many of his staff and others around the region had not experienced firsthand the busy hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 and were now getting their firsthand experience on hurricane disaster relief in the Panhandle.

After the prolonged period of emergency assistance and donated supplies distribution ends in the Panhandle, there will be a time for addressing lingering effects of trauma and mental illness caused by a storm of this magnitude.

"I run into staff and (Charities) board members who have very vivid memories of (1992's) Hurricane Andrew and it goes to show the post-traumatic stress that these things can cause," said Routsis-Arroyo, who noted that some $2 million of Red Cross grants were given regionally to assist with mental health counseling following last year's Hurricane Irma in Florida. He further credited Catholic Charities USA for recently designating $1 million in donated funds for Hurricane Michael victims.

"I thought what appeared to be a slow hurricane season in 2018 has turned into a monster. This has been the most active season on record in the Pacific Ocean, and certainly ours here in the Atlantic has been active," he added. "The surviving grace here is that it is now later in October, and we won't have the suffocating heat of August and September."

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Editor's Note: More information about recovery and volunteer efforts can be found online at https://bit.ly/2Cna8h2.

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Tracy writes for the Florida Catholic, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Miami.

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Tyler OrsburnBy Cindy WoodenVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with.Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said.One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow so...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with.

Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said.

One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his diocese or the bishops' conference.

"All of these involve issues that we are going to have to discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change."

For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts.

Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis.

Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism."

Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod.

"One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document.

The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own."

In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross.

Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory."

Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority.

"Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people.

As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod.

"A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts."

 

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Ueslei Marcelino, ReutersBy Cindy WoodenVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Honduran Bishop Jose Antonio Canales of Danli said that, given what is going on in his country and throughout Central America, he had to walk in the "Share the Journey" campaign of Caritas Internationalis.The 1.5-mile walk Caritas organized Oct. 21 from Rome's Trastevere neighborhood to the Vatican "is nothing when compared to what migrants are experiencing," said the bishop, who was in Rome for the Synod of Bishops while thousands of his fellow citizens were in a caravan heading toward Mexico and the United States to flee violence and poverty.Joseph Moeono-Kolio from Samoa, one of the young adult observers at the synod, also joined the walk because "migrants and refugees are being forced from their homes. They don't want to leave, but they have to, and once they arrive, they aren't welcome."Nicole Perez from the Philippines, another young synod observer, said that when she ...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Ueslei Marcelino, Reuters

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Honduran Bishop Jose Antonio Canales of Danli said that, given what is going on in his country and throughout Central America, he had to walk in the "Share the Journey" campaign of Caritas Internationalis.

The 1.5-mile walk Caritas organized Oct. 21 from Rome's Trastevere neighborhood to the Vatican "is nothing when compared to what migrants are experiencing," said the bishop, who was in Rome for the Synod of Bishops while thousands of his fellow citizens were in a caravan heading toward Mexico and the United States to flee violence and poverty.

Joseph Moeono-Kolio from Samoa, one of the young adult observers at the synod, also joined the walk because "migrants and refugees are being forced from their homes. They don't want to leave, but they have to, and once they arrive, they aren't welcome."

Nicole Perez from the Philippines, another young synod observer, said that when she was a small child, her mother went to Japan to work. "She returned when I was 10. The feeling of parting from your loved ones, it hurts. We should make migrants and refugees feel they are not alone in that journey."

Caritas Internationalis launched the "Share the Journey" campaign in September 2017 to encourage every Catholic everywhere in the world to get to know at least one migrant or refugee and listen to his or her story. The campaign also is supporting solidarity walks around the world.

Philippine Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila, president of Caritas, led the walk in Rome. Before leading a prayer and setting off toward the Vatican, he told reporters that in many places "there is fear" of migrants and refugees "because there is no personal encounter. It's natural to be afraid of what we don't know."

Although the journey to the Vatican was brief, he prayed that "every step we take this morning would be an act of solidarity with the millions of people on the move who do not know where their journey will end."

The group reached the Vatican in time to recite the Angelus prayer with Pope Francis, who greeted them after his midday address.

"I encourage this initiative of 'sharing the journey,' which is being promoted in many cities and can transform our relationship with migrants," the pope said.

Later, his Pontifex Twitter account shared the message: "Join Caritas and walk 1 million kilometers together with migrants and refugees. We are all on the Road to Emmaus being called to see the face of Christ."

Canadian Bishop Lionel Gendron of Saint-Jean-Longueuil, Quebec, said he joined the walk because migration "is one of the main challenges facing the world and the church."

"There is so much resistance in so many countries," he said.

Before setting off for the Vatican, Dominican Sister Helen Alford, vice dean of Rome's Pontifical University of St. Thomas, told Catholic News Service: "We can solve the migration crisis. We have the means."

The first step, she said, is for Catholics to pressure their governments to sign the U.N. "Global Compacts" for refugees and for "safe, orderly and regular migration." An international conference for the adoption of the compacts will be held in Morocco in December.

Adopting and implementing the compacts, Sister Alford said, will make migration "legal, transparent and manageable," saving lives and disrupting the "business" of human traffickers and smugglers.

Then, she said, "we need to promote the formation of migrants, so they can be part of the solution." The University of St. Thomas, more commonly known as the Angelicum, will be starting such a program soon for migrants in Rome, she said.

 

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Dennis SadowskiBy Dennis SadowskiCLEVELAND (CNS) -- Franciscan Sister Janice Cebula isn't one to turn down a chance to learn and be inspired.So when Network, the Catholic social justice lobby, decided to take its Nuns on the Bus campaign on the road again beginning Oct. 8 to call attention to the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act and its impact on social services and local communities, she readily agreed to join one leg of the trip.Sister Cebula, president of the Sisters of St. Francis of Clinton, Iowa, told a rally at Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry in Cleveland Oct. 20 that she has not been disappointed since joining the Tax Justice Truth Tour five days earlier in Omaha, Nebraska."You meet a lot of people who understand that we are all sisters and brothers," she said to applause from about 100 people. "And they act like it. We saw a lot of on-the-ground, really innovative programs that are integrative in addressing the whole person."But she said she fe...

IMAGE: CNS photo/Dennis Sadowski

By Dennis Sadowski

CLEVELAND (CNS) -- Franciscan Sister Janice Cebula isn't one to turn down a chance to learn and be inspired.

So when Network, the Catholic social justice lobby, decided to take its Nuns on the Bus campaign on the road again beginning Oct. 8 to call attention to the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act and its impact on social services and local communities, she readily agreed to join one leg of the trip.

Sister Cebula, president of the Sisters of St. Francis of Clinton, Iowa, told a rally at Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry in Cleveland Oct. 20 that she has not been disappointed since joining the Tax Justice Truth Tour five days earlier in Omaha, Nebraska.

"You meet a lot of people who understand that we are all sisters and brothers," she said to applause from about 100 people. "And they act like it. We saw a lot of on-the-ground, really innovative programs that are integrative in addressing the whole person."

But she said she feared some programs and families may be endangered by possible future cuts in federal spending in response to the tax law.

Beginning in Santa Monica, California, the tour was to wind through 21 states before ending near President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, Nov. 2.

Sister Simon Campbell, a Sister of Social Service and executive director of Network, said the Palm Beach locale was chosen to demonstrate to the president and Congress that the tax cut law will add up to $1.9 trillion to the federal deficit in the next decade, and that planned cuts in federal spending on nonmilitary programs will harm the lives of low- and moderate-income people.

Sister Cebula told Catholic News Service she was particularly impressed after hearing from five women who are part of Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry's Chopping for Change program. The women are nearing release from prison and under the program they are learning culinary and management skills at the Comeback Cafe at the Virgil E. Brown Center, headquarters of the Cuyahoga County government.

Chopping for Change is a partnership with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction and the Cuyahoga County Office of Reentry. It is designed to train women with marketable skills for Northeast Ohio's burgeoning local food scene.

"Meeting these women here just confirmed why I'm on the bus," Sister Cebula said.

Tomika Daniel, 41, one of the women, manages the cafe and told CNS that she expects she will be able to find work when she is released from prison in June.

"With the support I'm getting, I don't have to walk with my head down," she said.

The two-year-old program has welcomed 89 women; 40 have been released from prison and gained employment. Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry reported no recidivism among the women.

Andrew Genszler, president and CEO of the Lutheran agency, said it, like other nonprofits, depends on public money to operate programs that make a difference in people's lives. "We spend government money wisely. We spend government money efficiently and cutting government spending threatens the lives of people in need," he told the rally.

"We don't care if government is big. We don't care if government is small. We care that government works. And when it doesn't work, it's up to us as people of faith to remind the people in office of the implications of the decisions they make for people like us," Genszler said.

The bus tour was meant to call attention to the potential negative impact of the tax law on social programs, explained Sister Campbell, who planned to complete the entire 54-stop tour. She called for "reasonable revenue for responsible programs."

"The message is that this tax legislation gives away money to those at the top who don't need it. And now Congress is planning to take away services from everybody else," she said.

Congressional supporters of the tax law said that it would be a boon for business and generate new revenues for the federal government over the course of the next decade.

Maria Smith, a member of St. Patrick Parish in Cleveland, joined the rally, holding a sign with Network's signature call. She expressed concern for what she called the country's misplaced priorities toward increased military spending and decreased spending on vital human needs.

"I support a tax policy that supports social justice that makes us responsible for taking care of on another, that we are responsible social justice based-tax policy," Smith said.

During a stop at St. Frances Cabrini Parish in Tucson, Arizona, Oct. 11, a crowd of 200 people greeted the bus. Each person was invited to sign a pledge card to contact local elected officials about their concern about the fallout of the tax cut bill and then to sign the bus in the parish parking lot.

"Then, it's no longer just about the Nuns on the Bus. It's everybody," Sister Campbell told those gathered.

Salvatorian Father William Remmel welcomed the 10 sisters on the bus, stoking the crowd when he said "systems need to be held accountable and that the tax reform law "isn't just bad politics, it's bad theology."

Earlier in the day, the nuns stopped at the office of Rep. Martha McSally, R-Arizona, who was in a tight race for a U.S. Senate seat. McSally supported the 2017 tax cut law and Sister Campbell said that in a meeting with a legislative aide it became clear that the congresswoman would not be changing her position in the future.

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Contributing to this story was Michael Brown, managing editor of Catholic Outlook, newspaper of the Diocese of Tucson.

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Follow Sadowski on Twitter: @DennisSadowski.

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

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